Kenneth Wainstein

Kenneth L. Wainstein, Assistant Attorney General for National Security, at a news conference at the Justice Department in Washington regarding illegal export investigations, Thursday, Oct. 11, 2007. (AP Photo/Charles Dharapak)

Charles Dharapak

Two former presidential advisers and an ex-New York City police commissioner will serve on a three-member panel to boost the state's counterterrorism operations. 

Gov. Andrew Cuomo announced the formation of the advisory panel Tuesday. The effort will be led by Kenneth Wainstein, who served as White House homeland security adviser to President George W. Bush. Wainstein is now a partner at Davis Polk & Wardwell, an international law firm. 

The other members of the panel will be Lisa Monaco, who was President Barack Obama's homeland security adviser, and former New York City Police Commissioner Ray Kelly. 

Kelly has previously advised the state on homeland security-related issues. When Cuomo announced the launch of a college that would focus on emergency preparedness and homeland security, he named Kelly as an adviser. 

"We are fortunate to have three of the world's leading counterterrorism experts assist us in our efforts to remain vigilant as we work to adapt our security measures to the evolving tactics of those who seek to do us harm," Cuomo said in a statement.

The advisory panel is reviewing the state's counterterrorism operations and will make recommendations for improving security, especially at airports, bridges and tunnels. 

The panel's recommendations will be submitted to Cuomo in advance of his State of the State address in January. 

New York was the site of a terrorist attack on Oct. 31, when a man mowed down bicyclists and pedestrians on a bike path in Manhattan. Eight people were killed in the attack. 

In 1993, the World Trade Center bombing killed six people and injured more than 1,000. 

The deadliest terrorist attack on U.S. soil was in 2001. The 9/11 attacks killed nearly 3,000 people and destroyed the World Trade Center in New York. 

"New York is an internationally known symbol of freedom and equality, and with this rich heritage comes the reality that we are also a target for those who oppose these values," Cuomo said. 

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