Capitol Christmas Tree Lighting

The 2017 Capitol Christmas Tree is lit on the West Lawn of the U.S. Capitol, Wednesday, Dec. 6, 2017, in Washington. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik)

Andrew Harnik

The House passed a bill Wednesday that would allow individuals who have permits to carry a concealed firearm in their home state to possess the weapon in other states with concealed-carry laws. 

The Concealed Carry Reciprocity Act of 2017 passed by a 231-198 vote. Most Republicans and six Democrats supported the bill. Fourteen Republicans joined a vast majority of Democrats in opposition to the measure. 

It's the first gun measure of any kind considered by Congress in the aftermath of two major mass shootings in Las Vegas and Texas. The bill was backed by the National Rifle Association, which called passage of the legislation "the most far-reaching expansion of self-defense rights in modern American history." 

Opponents of the bill said it would override state laws and increase crime. Former U.S. Rep. Gabrielle Giffords, who was severely wounded at an event in 2011, said she is "furious" the House passed the concealed carry bill. 

"Let's be clear: These politicians are trading our safety for political contributions from the gun lobby," she said. 

The legislation also included a provision that is supported by members of both parties to bolster the background check system. It would encourage federal, state and local agencies to provide updated information when someone is convicted of a crime. 

This was an issue raised in the aftermath of the Texas church shooting. The gunman who killed 26 people had a prior domestic violence conviction while he was in the Air Force. But the Air Force failed to disclose that information in the federal crime database. 

If the information about the gunman was included in the database, he would have been unable to legally purchase guns. Federal law prohibits convicted felons from buying firearms. 

Most members of the New York House delegation opposed the concealed carry bill, including two Republicans — U.S. Reps. Dan Donovan and Peter King. 

Here is how the entire state congressional delegation voted: 

YES

Rep. Chris Collins (R), Rep. John Faso (R), Rep. John Katko (R), Rep. Tom Reed (R), Rep. Elise Stefanik (R), Rep. Claudia Tenney (R), Rep. Lee Zeldin (R)

NO

Rep. Yvette Clarke (D), Rep. Joseph Crowley (D), Rep. Dan Donovan (R), Rep. Eliot Engel (D), Rep. Adriano Espaillat (D), Rep. Hakeem Jeffries (D), Rep. Brian Higgins (D), Rep. Peter King (R), Rep. Nita Lowey (D), Rep. Carolyn Maloney (D), Rep. Sean Patrick Maloney (D), Rep. Gregory Meeks (D), Rep. Grace Meng (D), Rep. Jerrold Nadler (D), Rep. Kathleen Rice (D), Rep. Jose Serrano (D), Rep. Louise Slaughter (D), Rep. Tom Suozzi (D), Rep. Paul Tonko (D), Rep. Nydia Velazquez (D)

11
1
0
1
5