Details for Bridge

Bridge By Phillip Alder
♠

♥
♦
♣

put him on the spot as soon as possible

Dealer: South
Vulnerable: Both

North
08-07-18
♠AQ85
♥ Q 10 6
♦6
♣AQ963
West
♠32
♥AK5432
♦J73
♣KJ

East
♠K7
♥87
♦ Q 10 9 8 5 4
♣742

South
♠ J 10 9 6 4
♥J9
♦AK2
♣ 10 8 5
South
Pass
2♠

West
1♥
Pass

North
2♣
4♠

East
Pass
All Pass

Opening lead: ♥ A
Grace Speare, a psychic and
New Age author, wrote, “Welcome
every problem as an opportunity.
Each moment is the great challenge,
the best thing that ever happened to
you.”
That is perfect for a bridge
player. At the table, one should treat
almost every trick as a challenge.
In today’s deal, look at only the
West and North hands. Against four
spades, West leads the heart ace: six,
COPYRIGHT: 2018, UNITED FEATURE SYNDICATE

eight, nine. How should he plan the
defense?
Sitting West was Charles
McMahon, playing in a pairs tournament in Sydney, Australia. The
deal was originally reported by Ron
Klinger.
McMahon counted up the highcard points, which all experts do on
every deal. Dummy had 14, and he
held 12. That left 14 for East and
South combined, but since South
had bid at the two-level, East rated
to have only one useful honor card,
not two. West could also see that
the club suit was lying favorably for
declarer.
First, though, what was the
heart position? East’s card had to
be either a singleton or the start of
a signal with a doubleton. So, West
cashed the heart king; everyone followed. Now West shifted to the club
jack!
South understandably thought
this was a singleton, or perhaps highlow from a doubleton. Also, if East
had the club king, clearly West had
the spade king. Everything seemed
easy. Declarer won with dummy’s
club ace, played a diamond to his ace
and ran the spade jack. Imagine his
surprise when East won with the king
and returned a club to West’s king for
down one.
If you cannot win by normal
means, try to challenge an opponent
to find the winning line.
Tues., 8.7

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