Details for Daily Bridge

Bridge By Phillip Alder
♠

♥
♦
♣

a common play that is often wrong

Dealer: South
Vulnerable: North-South
North
♠754
♥AJ5
♦K54
♣ 10 8 6 2
West
♠ K Q 10 9
♥32
♦ A 10 7 2
♣QJ3

06-11-19

East
♠8632
♥ 10 4
♦J983
♣A54

South
♠AJ
♥KQ9876
♦Q6
♣K97
South
1♥
3♥

West
Dbl.
Pass

North
2♥
4♥

East
Pass
All Pass

Opening lead: ♠ K
Moliere, a 17th-century French
playwright, actor and poet, wrote, “It
is a stupidity second to none, to busy
oneself with the correction of the
world.”
It is sensible to busy oneself
with the correction of one’s bridge
errors. In today’s deal, West made
a mistake that I see often from my
students. They get so nervous that a
winning card will suddenly evaporate.
COPYRIGHT: 2019, UNITED FEATURE SYNDICATE

How should the defense proceed
against four hearts after West leads
the spade king?
In the auction, East might have
advanced with two spades, but his
hand was a tad too weak. South’s
three-heart rebid was a game-try
with no particular side-suit weakness
and, in theory, a six-card heart suit.
North raised to game, liking his pointcount, ace and king.
South apparently had four
unavoidable losers: one spade, one
diamond and two clubs (and that
assumed East had the club ace
despite West’s takeout double). How
could declarer have gotten home?
It seemed impossible, but South
did not give up. He won the first trick
with his spade ace and returned
the spade jack, under which East
unwisely signaled with the eight,
suggesting a useful honor in diamonds.
West shifted to a trump.
Declarer won on the board, ruffed the
last spade and led a low diamond.
Now West fell from grace, winning
with his ace. South took the next
trump with his king, cashed the
diamond queen, crossed to the board
with a trump, discarded a club on the
diamond king and played a club to
his king to get home.
Playing second hand high with
an ace on defense is almost always
wrong.
Tues., 6/11

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