Details for Daily Bridge

Bridge By Phillip Alder
♠

♥
♦
♣

after trick one, king from ace-king

Dealer: South
Vulnerable: East-West

North
04-09-19
♠96
♥83
♦ A K Q J 10
♣ K J 10 7
West
♠K832
♥ Q 10 6 5 4
♦963
♣4

East
♠ A J 10 7
♥A92
♦8742
♣53

South
♠Q54
♥KJ7
♦5
♣AQ9862
South
1♣
3♣
5♣

West
Pass
Pass
Pass

North
2♦
4♣
Pass

East
Pass
Pass
Pass

Opening lead: ♠ 2 or ♥ 5
Eugene Field, when critiquing an
actor in a production of “King Lear,”
wrote, “Mr. Clarke played the king
all evening as though under constant
fear that someone else was about to
play the ace.”
Yesterday, we started looking at
deals that exhibit why, after trick one,
you lead the king from an ace-king or
king-queen holding, and an ace-lead
COPYRIGHT: 2019, UNITED FEATURE SYNDICATE

is unsupported, asking partner to
encourage only with the king.
In today’s deal, South is in five
clubs. How should East defend after
winning the first trick with either the
spade ace (West led the spade two)
or the heart ace (West led the heart
five)?
In this auction, two diamonds
is a strong jump shift, showing
either long, strong diamonds or good
diamonds and primary club support.
The typical high-card point-count is
13-16.
Note that three no-trump can be
defeated if the defenders are careful.
I think I would have led the
spade two, preferring to lead from a
king than from a queen because it
needs less from partner to gain quick
tricks. The auction should leave EastWest realizing that they need to rake
in three immediate winners.
After taking the first trick, East
should see that he needs his partner
to hold one of the major-suit kings.
But which one does he have?
East finds out by leading his
other ace, denying the king, and
noting partner’s signal. If West
encourages (as he will in spades),
East continues that suit. But if West
discourages (as he will in hearts),
East reverts to the other suit (spades
here).

Tues., 4/9

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