Details for Daily Bridge

Bridge By Phillip Alder
♠

♥
♦
♣

the award winner for last year

Dealer: West
Vulnerable: Neither

North
01-04-19
♠Q
♥54
♦ K Q 10 9 3
♣ Q 10 4 3 2
West
♠A4
♥986
♦8752
♣A765

East
♠ K 10 9 7 6 5 2
♥J
♦J64
♣KJ
South
♠J83
♥ A K Q 10 7 3 2
♦A
♣98

South
4♥

West
Pass
Pass

North
Pass
Pass

East
3♠
Pass

Opening lead: ♠ A
Each year, the International
Bridge Press Association gives out
awards in several categories. Last
year was different, in that every winner received an all-expenses-paid
trip to Sanya, China, to compete in
the Hainan Bridge Festival.
This was the Gidwani Family
Trust Defence of the Year winner.
Look at the North and East hands.
South was in four hearts. West
COPYRIGHT: 2019, UNITED FEATURE SYNDICATE

led the spade ace. Given dummy’s
singleton, East followed suit with
the two, a suit-preference signal
for clubs. West cashed the club ace
and continued with a second club to
East’s king. What did East do now?
Sitting East was GeO Tislevoll.
The deal was played during the 2018
North Island Teams Championship
in New Zealand. The original article
about the deal was written by Liam
Milne from Australia.
Tislevoll built up a picture of
the deal. Since West had not bid four
spades, he had probably started with
at most two spades. If West had a
singleton, a spade return now would
work because he could ruff with a
heart higher than North’s five. West,
a passed hand, could not have the
diamond ace, and was unlikely to
have a natural trump trick.
Many players would shift to
a trump, but South wins the trick,
cashes the diamond ace, ruffs a
spade, discards his last spade on the
diamond king and claims.
Leading the spade king is not
good enough, because South’s jack
sets up. Tislevoll found the killing
play when he led a low spade! Yes,
declarer took the trick, but he still
had to lose either a late spade trick
or, if he tried to ruff his last spade, a
trump trick to West.

Fri., 1/4

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