Details for Daily Bridge

Bridge By Phillip Alder
♠

♥
♦
♣

disciplined bidding and deadly defense

Dealer: East
Vulnerable: Neither

North
♠6532
♥K74
♦J98
♣AK5
West
♠974
♥ 10 9 2
♦ 10 5
♣QJ986

04-13-19

East
♠8
♥AQ653
♦AK72
♣ 10 4 3

South
♠ A K Q J 10
♥J8
♦Q643
♣72
South

West

North

1♠
2♠

Pass
Pass

2♥
Pass

East
1♥
Pass
Pass

Opening lead: ♥ 10
Katharine Hepburn said,
“Without discipline, there’s no life at
all.” Without discipline at the bridge
table, the game becomes more like
craps than an intellectual exercise.
In today’s example, how should
the defense proceed after West leads
the heart 10 against two spades?
Notice the disciplined bidding
by everyone. North’s two-heart cueCOPYRIGHT: 2019, UNITED FEATURE SYNDICATE

bid raise showed three- or four-card
spade support and at least gameinvitational values. Despite the 11
high-card points, this was a slight
stretch because his heart king was
probably not pulling its weight, and
he had nine losers (three spades,
two hearts, three diamonds and one
club), which is the normal number for
a single raise. South, with six-and-ahalf losers, did not try for game. That
was a wise decision, given that even
two spades was too high!
After winning the first trick with
his heart queen, East led the diamond
king, king from ace-king after trick
one. When West signaled encouragingly with the 10, East cashed the
diamond ace and led the diamond
seven, an unnecessary suit-preference signal for hearts.
West, after ruffing, led his heart
nine. East took that trick and played
his last diamond, knowing that West
would be able to ruff higher than the
dummy to defeat the contract. The
defenders took two hearts, two diamonds and two ruffs.
Several of the examples used
this week and next were sent to me
by Steve Conrad of Manhasset, Long
Island. He is an expert player who
teaches on a few cruises each year
and has a keen eye for an instructive
deal.

Sat., 4/13

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