Details for Daily bridge

Bridge By Phillip Alder
♠

♥
♦
♣

why be faced with the problem?

Dealer: West
Vulnerable: Neither

North
02-13-19
♠75
♥Q95
♦ A 10 8 3
♣ K 10 9 6
West
♠ A K Q 10 8 4 2
♥K3
♦95
♣Q5

East
♠J93
♥84
♦QJ64
♣A832

South
♠6
♥ A J 10 7 6 2
♦K72
♣J74
South West
1♠
3♥
3♠

North
Pass
4♥

East
2♠
All Pass

Opening lead: ♣ Q
Hannah More, an English poet,
playwright and philanthropist who
died in 1833, said, “Goals help you
overcome short-term problems.”
In bridge, one deal is a shortterm problem lasting 13 tricks. You
also know your goal -- making or
breaking the contract. Occasionally,
though, you have a goal you never
should have faced. For example, in
today’s deal, what do you think of

the auction? How does South get
on in four hearts after West leads
the club queen? What would have
happened in four spades by West?
South was very light to overcall three hearts. Still, that should
have made West feel happy about
his heart king. He should have
jumped to four spades.
Against four hearts, I would
have led the spade ace to see
the dummy, hoping a vital shift
would not then be coming too
late. After the dangerous-looking
club-queen lead, declarer covered
with dummy’s king, of course.
Here, East would have done best
to encourage with the eight. Then,
if declarer took the heart finesse,
West could have won, played a club
to his partner’s ace, received a club
ruff and cashed the spade ace to
defeat the contract. But, of course,
declarer, anticipating the ruff, probably would have played a heart to
the ace and another heart to get
home.
In reality, though, East understandably took the first trick and
tried to give his partner an immediate ruff. South played two rounds
of trumps to achieve his goal.
At double-dummy, there was
no defense to four hearts. Four
spades ought to go down one,
West losing one heart, two diamonds and one club -- an excellent
sacrifice.

COPYRIGHT: 2019, UNITED FEATURE SYNDICATE

Wed., 2/13

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