Details for Daily bridge

Bridge By Phillip Alder
♠

♥
♦
♣

believe your eyes, not your opponents

Dealer: East
Vulnerable: East-West
North
♠532
♥K4
♦A872
♣J873
West
♠ Q 10 9 8 7 4
♥ 10 8 5 2
♦Q
♣94

06-12-19

East
♠AK6
♥AQ963
♦ K J 10 5
♣A

South
♠J
♥J7
♦9643
♣ K Q 10 6 5 2
South

West

North

3♣

Pass

5♣

East
1♥
??

Opening lead: ♥ 2
George Santayana, an author
who was born in Spain, spent his
formative years in the United States
and returned to Europe at the age of
48, wrote, “A man’s feet should be
planted in his country, but his eyes
should survey the world.”
A bridge player controls his
own hand, but he should estimate its
place in the whole deal.
Look at the East hand in today’s
COPYRIGHT: 2019, UNITED FEATURE SYNDICATE

diagram. He opens one heart (do you
agree?), South makes a three-club
weak jump overcall, West passes,
and North jumps to five clubs. What
should East do now?
It would be reasonable for
East to open two no-trump. Yes, the
five-card major and singleton club
ace are potential drawbacks, but
better the singleton in a minor than
in a major. Here, that would work
well. Assuming South passes (or
intervenes with three clubs), West
can transfer straight into four spades
(or use Stayman to look for a 4-4
heart fit first). Notice that six spades
by East is excellent and succeeds.
Six hearts is less good, but luckily
makes.
When East opened one heart,
and South jumped to three clubs,
West might have responded three
hearts, but judged his hand a tad too
weak. Then North made an advance
sacrifice. He knew the opponents
could make game somewhere, and
the vulnerability was favorable.
At the table, this was passed
out! But East should have doubled.
How could five clubs possibly make?
Declarer lost one spade, two
hearts, three diamonds and one club
for down five. Minus 250 was a great
score; minus 1,100 would have been
bad, especially since, as expected, no
East-West pair bid a slam.

Wed., 6/12

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