Details for Daily Bridge

Bridge By Phillip Alder
♠

♥
♦
♣

backpedal with balanced hands

Dealer: South
Vulnerable: Neither
North
♠KQ83
♥AQJ
♦A62
♣Q76
West
♠97
♥ 10 7 4 2
♦987
♣ J 10 9 2

09-05-19

East
♠J6
♥98653
♦ K J 10 3
♣K4

South
♠ A 10 5 4 2
♥K
♦Q54
♣A853
South
1♠
4♠
5♥

West
Pass
Pass
Pass

North
2 NT
4 NT
6♠

East
Pass
Pass
All Pass

Opening lead: ♦ 9 or ♣ J
When was this speech given?
“So I come before you with a budget
that is honest in its discussion of our
challenges, creative in its possible
solutions, compassionate in its commitment to our most vulnerable and
balanced on the bottom line.”
In bridge, we have balanced and
unbalanced hands. The latter tend to
be more productive because of their
COPYRIGHT: 2019, UNITED FEATURE SYNDICATE

long suits, but it is usually necessary
to have a fit with partner. Balanced
hands have more losers, which is not
good.
In today’s deal, North was
excessively optimistic. His two-notrump response promised four-plus
spades and at least game-forcing
values. South jumped to four spades,
which purported to show a minimum
with no singleton or void. South correctly imagined his heart holding as
king-doubleton. Then North, with a
six-and-a-half-loser hand, should
have passed. Instead, he pushed his
partner into six spades.
What should South do after the
diamond nine or club jack lead?
In each case, South will draw
trumps, discard two diamonds on
dummy’s hearts, then hope to avoid
two club losers.
After the diamond lead, South
will have to divine the club position,
which he is most unlikely to do.
The normal start, though, is the
club jack. But that would tell South
that East has the king, which he will
successfully hope is singleton or
doubleton.
The introductory piece was
said by James H. Douglas, Jr., some
85 years ago. He was an assistant
secretary of the treasury for both
President Herbert Hoover and
President Franklin Roosevelt.

Thurs., 9/5

Categories

You may be interested in