Details for Daily Bridge

Bridge By Phillip Alder
♠

♥
♦
♣

it is an easy trap to descend into

Dealer: South
Vulnerable: Both
North
♠83
♥A9742
♦ 10 8 6 3
♣A5
West
♠652
♥KJ83
♦2
♣ Q 10 9 7 4

05-23-19

East
♠A4
♥ Q 10 6
♦QJ97
♣J832

South
♠ K Q J 10 9 7
♥5
♦AK54
♣K6
South
1♠
4♠

West
Pass
Pass

North
1 NT
Pass

East
Pass
Pass

Opening lead: ♦ 2
Saki, whose real name was
Hector Hugh Munro, was a Scottish
short-story writer. He advised: “In
baiting a mouse trap with cheese,
always leave room for the mouse.”
There is a nasty trap in this
deal, into which many players would
fall.
South is in four spades. West
leads the diamond two: three, seven,
ace. South plays a sneaky spade
COPYRIGHT: 2019, UNITED FEATURE SYNDICATE

nine, but East wins with the ace
and returns the diamond jack. How
should South continue from there?
In the auction, South decided
not to give free information to
the defenders. He thought it most
unlikely that diamonds would play
better than spades, and opposite a
one-no-trump response, a slam was
improbable. If anything, four spades
was a slight overbid, but either a
good partner would hold a useful
card or two, or an opponent would
misdefend.
To the original declarer, everything looked like smooth sailing.
At trick three, he covered East’s
diamond jack with his king. However,
West ruffed and exited with his last
trump. Then South had to lose two
more diamond tricks and go down
one.
North was cheesed off. He mentioned that if South had played a low
diamond from his hand at trick three,
yes, he would have lost the trick and
the next one when East gave West
a diamond ruff, but he would have
won West’s return, drawn trumps and
claimed.
Also, North added, if it turned
out that diamonds were 3-2 all along,
losing trick three would have cost
only an overtrick.
Always ask yourself what might
go wrong: Is there a trap about to
snap?
Thurs., 5/23

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