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KID SAFETY

YOUR CONCUSSION

EXPERTS

Youth Sports Injuries
Youth sports leagues
are a great way for kids
to get exercise and make
friends. According to
Safe Kids Worldwide,
more than 46.5 million
U.S. children participate in sports each year.
Most do so without
injury, but as with any
physical activity, there
are some risks.
One-third of children
who play a team sport
at some point suffer an
injury that is serious
enough to take time out
from practice or games.
Most of these injuries
don’t happen during
games; rather, 62 percent
of injuries happen during practice. The most
common types of injuries are sprains, muscle
strains, bone or growth
plate injuries, repetitive motion injuries and
heat-related illnesses.
Additionally, girls have a
much higher risk of ACL
injuries.
However, this doesn’t
mean your kids can’t
safely participate in
sports. There are a lot of
steps parents and coaches can take to reduce the
risk of injury and lessen

the effects of injury
when they do happen.
MAKE SURE KIDS
ARE WEARING
THE RIGHT PROTECTIVE GEAR
This could be helmets and pads for
football and hockey,
shin guards in soccer, knee and elbow
pads in volleyball,
goggles in racquetball or
whatever other equipment is recommended.
This gear should be in
good condition and fit
properly and, especially
with helmets, may need
to be replaced if your
child sustains a particularly hard hit.
UNDERSTAND THE
RISK OF CONCUSSION
Concussions and other
head injuries are becoming an increasing risk
in youth football. Talk
to your child’s coach or
school leadership about
what the team is doing
to prevent concussions,
both during practice
and games, and that the
coach or trainer knows
to watch for signs of
head injury and has a

BRIAN RIEGER, PHD, PROGRAM DIRECTOR
AND CLAUDINE WARD, MD, MEDICAL DIRECTOR

plan to take the child
out and go through the
necessary medical evaluations before allowing
your child back into the
game.

Concussion is a head injury that occurs when the normal
functioning of the brain is disrupted by a blow or jolt to the
head. Common symptoms include headache, dizziness and
memory problems. Most people recover from concussion in a
week or two, but when symptoms last longer and affect

BE AWARE OF THE
HEAT
You don’t have to be
in 100-degree days for
a child to be at risk of
heat exhaustion. Parents and coaches should
watch children closely,
ensuring they are getting
enough to drink, taking
time to rest (including
in the shade, if necessary) and that players are
appropriately dressed for
the weather. This is especially important in very
hot or humid climates.

performance at work or school, ask for the experts.
The Upstate Concussion Center provides comprehensive
evaluation and treatment services for concussion and
sports concussion.

315.464.8986

|

WWW.UPSTATE.EDU/CONCUSSION

AUBURN LITTLE LEAGUE SCORES FOR WEEK OF MAY 6 - 10, 2019
The Lil Giants won 6-5 on Thursday in walk off fashion in the bottom of the 6th Inning against Summit Auto. Great Pitching and aggressive
base running lead them to victory. The Lil Giants used 4 pitchers to combine for 17 strikeouts with Pitcher Myers and McBride owning half
of them. Other big contributors were Casler, Rielly Hurley, Eric Barski, Jacob Morrell, Carson Bona, and Shane Simpson. Summit Auto Struck
hard in the First Inning with a Grand Slam off the bat of Alec Pettigrass. Jaccob Adams posted 9 Strikeouts for Summit in the Loss.
In a nail biting game, Bouley Construction edged out Michael & Smolak in a come from behind Victory to win 8-7.
Steven and Michael Ambroggio combined for 8 strikeouts over 6 innings of work. Steven Ambroggio helped with the bat with 2 hits
including a double. Hodson added 2 hits for 4 runs to help lead their team to the win.
Jacob Fallon, Jed Lloyd, and Brody Romero Pitched for Michael & Smolak. Jacob Fallon added 2 Runs on 2 hits while Charlie Losani
contributed 2 runs on 3 hits.

Sports Injury Prevention Tips from the American Academy of Pediatrics
3/16/2017 - More American children are competing
in sports than ever before.
Sports help children and
adolescents keep their bodies fit and feel good about
themselves. However, there
are some important injury
prevention tips that can
help parents promote a
safe, optimal sports experience for their child. Please
feel free to use them in any
print or broadcast story,
with appropriate attribution of source.
Injury Risks
All sports have a risk of
injury. Fortunately, for the
vast majority of youth, the
benefits of sports participation outweigh the risks. In
general, the more contact

in a sport, the greater the
risk of a traumatic injury.
However, most injuries in
young athletes are due to
overuse.
The most frequent types
of sports injuries are
sprains (injuries to ligaments) strains (injuries to
muscles), and stress fractures (injuries to bones).
Injury occurs when excessive stress is placed on
tendons, joints, bones and
muscle. In a growing child,
point tenderness over a
bone should be evaluated further by a medical
provider even if there is
minimal swelling or limitation in motion. Contact
your pediatrician if you
have additional questions
or concerns.

To reduce the risk of
injury:
Take time off. Plan to
have at least 1 day off
per week and at least one
month off per year from
training for a particular
sport to allow the body to
recover.
Wear the right gear.
Players should wear appropriate and properly fit
protective equipment such
as pads (neck, shoulder,
elbow, chest, knee, shin),
helmets, mouthpieces,
face guards, protective
cups, and eyewear. Young
athletes should not assume
that protective gear will
prevent all injuries while
performing more dangerous or risky activities.

Strengthen muscles.
Conditioning exercises
during practice strengthens
muscles used in play.
Increase flexibility.
Stretching exercises after
games or practice can increase flexibility. Stretching
should also be incorporated into a daily fitness plan.
Use the proper technique. This should be reinforced during the playing
season.
Take breaks. Rest periods
during practice and games
can reduce injuries and
prevent heat illness.
Play safe. Strict rules
against headfirst sliding
(baseball and softball),
spearing (football), and
checking (in hockey)
should be enforced.

70th Year of Auburn
Little League Baseball!
Come watch us play.
WE’RE NOT JUST TEAMMATES, WE’RE FAMILY

Do not play through
pain.
Avoid heat illness by
drinking plenty of fluids
before, during and after
exercise or play; decrease
or stop practices or competitions during high heat/
humidity periods; wear
light clothing.
If children are jumping on a trampoline, they
should be supervised by a
responsible adult, and only
one child should be on
the trampoline at a time;
75% of trampoline injuries
occur when more than
one person is jumping at
a time.
Sports-Related Emotional Stress
The pressure to win can

cause significant emotional
stress for a child. Sadly,
many coaches and parents
consider winning the most
important aspect of sports.
Young athletes should be
judged on effort, sportsmanship and hard work.
They should be rewarded
for trying hard and for
improving their skills
rather than punished or
criticized for losing a game
or competition. The main
goal should be to have fun
and learn lifelong physical
activity skills.
Copyright © 2017 American
Academy of Pediatrics
Source: https://www.aap.org/enus/about-the-aap/aap-press-room/
news-features-and-safety-tips/
Pages/Sports-Injury-PreventionTip-Sheet.aspx

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