Details for 29660-1.pdf

Bridge By Phillip Alder
♠

♥
♦
♣

on valentine's day, guess the key card

Dealer: North
Vulnerable: Neither

North
♠7
♥AKJ9
♦KQ84
♣ K 10 6 4
West
♠J9853
♥74
♦763
♣Q52

02-14-19

East
♠ Q 10 6 2
♥Q6532
♦ A 10 2
♣A

South
♠AK4
♥ 10 8
♦J95
♣J9873
South

West

Redbl. 1 ♠
3♣
Pass
5♣
Pass

North
1♦
2♥
4♣
Pass

East
Dbl.
2♠
Pass
Pass

Opening lead: ♥ 7
On Valentine’s Day, it seems
only right to have a deal featuring
the queen of hearts, who ought to
be a darling. But she certainly isn’t
in “Alice in Wonderland,” where she
keeps crying, “Off with her head!”
Still, what part should she play
in this deal? South is in five clubs,
and West leads the seven of hearts.
COPYRIGHT: 2019, UNITED FEATURE SYNDICATE

This deal is in “Right Through
the Pack” by Robert Darvas and
Norman de Villiers Hart, which was
first published in 1948.
The bidding is weird, as was
its wont in those days. East’s double
with only one club is the most
debatable call, and some other bids
would not escape criticism.
Declarer, after winning the first
trick with the ace of hearts, would
have led a low club if he could
have peeked into East’s hand. But
not unnaturally, he crossed to the
king of spades and ran the knave
of clubs (as jacks were known back
then) to East’s ace. What did he do
now?
Had West led a singleton, and
had South cleverly played the eight
from 10-8-4? Should East switch
to the two of diamonds, playing his
partner for the knave?
The queen of hearts was also
analyzing the position, and she
spotted the decapitating defense
-- she leapt out of East’s hand and
landed face upward on the table!
Declarer, after winning on the
board, needed to get to his hand
to take a second trump finesse.
However, he could not. He tried a
low diamond, but East won with his
ace and led another heart, so that
West could overruff with the queen
of clubs.

Thurs., 2/14

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