Details for CITIZEN PROMOS/FILLERS - Ad from 2020-07-31

Bridge

♠
♥
♦
♣

By Phillip Alder

even good players err occasionally

Dealer: South
Vulnerable: Both
North
07-31-20
♠642
♥ A 10 8 6 3
♦Q853
♣Q
West
♠ A 10 9 3
♥4
♦A742
♣J962

East
♠ -♥J972
♦ K J 10 9
♣ K 10 8 5 4

South
♠KQJ875
♥KQ5
♦6
♣A73
South
1♠
4♠

West
Pass
Pass

North
2♠
Pass

East
Pass
Pass

Opening lead: ♦ A
If you study action photos of
top tennis players, you will see that
their eyes are rarely looking directly
at the ball. Is this because the
rebound of the ball after being hit by
the racket is too quick for the eye to
follow?
Good bridge players occasionally take their eyes off the ball too.
Let’s end the week with a couple
of examples. Against South’s fourCOPYRIGHT: 2020, UNITED FEATURE SYNDICATE

spade contract, West led the diamond ace and continued with a low
diamond when his partner signaled
enthusiastically with the jack. The
expert South tried dummy’s queen,
but East covered with the king, and
declarer ruffed. How should he have
continued?
When a defender has four
trumps, it is usually right to try to
force declarer to ruff something,
in the hope that he will lose trump
control. But on this deal, at doubledummy (everyone could have seen
all of the cards), West’s only winning lead was his singleton heart.
South cashed the club ace,
ruffed a club in the dummy and
played a trump. True, if the spades
had split 2-2 or 3-1, he would have
been fine. Here, though, West won
with his spade ace and returned
the spade 10. Declarer took another
round of trumps, then tried to cash
some hearts. West ruffed the second
round and led a club to his partner’s
king: down one.
After the club ruff, South
should have crossed to hand with a
heart and ruffed his last club before
touching trumps. Even if a defender
could have won with the spade ace
and given his partner a heart ruff,
the contract would have been safe.
Ruff those losers in the
dummy.

Fri., 7/31

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