Details for CITIZEN PROMOS/FILLERS - Ad from 2021-02-18

Bridge

♠
♥
♦
♣

By Phillip Alder

partner points the way home
Dealer: North
Vulnerable: Both
North
♠K854
♥ J 10
♦ K Q J 10
♣K96
West
♠A96
♥AK763
♦2
♣8754

02-18-21

East
♠3
♥Q952
♦875
♣ Q J 10 3 2

South
♠ Q J 10 7 2
♥84
♦A9643
♣A
South

West

1♠
4♠

2♥
Pass

North
1♦
2♠
Pass

East
Pass
3♥
Pass

Opening lead: ??
Martha Quinn, one of the
first video jockeys on MTV, said,
“Demand no more out of your
partner than what you are willing to
give yourself.” That is a reasonable
thought for a bridge player.
Partners do well to concentrate
on defense. That is much more
important than bidding.
This is the type of deal that is
COPYRIGHT: 2021, UNITED FEATURE SYNDICATE

a stroll in the park for experts but
guesswork for the inexperienced.
How should East-West card to
defeat four spades?
West, who could anticipate
his partner’s singleton spade, was
tempted to sacrifice in five hearts.
How would that contract have done?
There is an important defensive
leading rule. Usually, we lead the
ace from ace-king. But there are
three times when you should lead
the king from ace-king: first, and
rarest, when you have ace-kingdoubleton; second, at trick one in a
bid-and-raised suit by your partnership; third, after trick one, which we
looked at in yesterday’s column.
Here, West leads the heart
king, and East signals enthusiastically with the nine because he holds
the queen. Now West should see
how to defeat the contract, shifting
to his singleton diamond. Declarer
wins on the board, plays a club to
his ace and leads a sneaky spade
jack, feigning a finesse for the
queen. But West dashes in with his
ace, leads the heart seven to his
partner’s queen and receives a diamond ruff to defeat the contract.
Finally, five hearts goes down
two if the defense goes: club to the
ace, diamond to the 10, club king
and club ruff. But that’s from the
twilight zone.

Thurs., 2/18

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