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Bridge

♠
♥
♦
♣

By Phillip Alder

pluck the tricks out of the air
Dealer: South
Vulnerable: East-West
North
♠ A J 10
♥Q85
♦K842
♣J63
West
♠854
♥63
♦7653
♣KQ72

02-20-21

East
♠97632
♥ 10 9 4
♦A
♣ A 10 8 5
South
♠KQ
♥AKJ72
♦ Q J 10 9
♣94

South
1♥
2♦
4♥

West
Pass
Pass
Pass

North
1 NT
3♥
Pass

East
Pass
Pass
Pass

Opening lead: ♣ K
This week, we have been looking at some defensive techniques. In
each deal, one defender could see
how to defeat the contract, but it
was not so clear to partner. The inthe-know player had to take control
immediately and hope that partner
got on the same page.
It made me think of “carpe
COPYRIGHT: 2021, UNITED FEATURE SYNDICATE

diem,” which I thought meant “seize
the day.” Apparently, though, it
was first used by Horace in 23 B.C.,
and really means “pluck the day.”
Loosely translated, Horace wrote,
“While we’re talking, envious time is
fleeing. Pluck the day; put no trust
in the future.”
In bridge, of course, we need
to “pluck the trick,” which is “carpe
dolum” apparently.
In today’s deal, one player cannot afford to spend time smelling
the roses; he must pluck the right
cards to defeat the contract. What
happens in four hearts after West
leads the club king?
In the auction, South correctly
opened one heart, not one no-trump.
Always try to show a five-card
major, and here South had no rebid
problems. North responded with one
no-trump forcing. (What would you
bid in Standard American? It would
be a nightmare.) On the next round,
the jump to three hearts showed
game-invitational values with threecard support.
East took control immediately
-- there was no time to waste. He
overtook his partner’s club king with
the ace, cashed the diamond ace
and returned the club five. Then it
was easy for West to take that trick
and give his partner a diamond ruff
to defeat the contract.

Sat., 2/20

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