Details for CITIZEN PROMOS/FILLERS - Ad from 2021-06-08

Bridge

♠
♥
♦
♣

By Phillip Alder

Assume normAl, not unusuAl

Dealer: East
Vulnerable: East-West

North
♠ Q 10 6 3
♥A2
♦Q954
♣ 10 7 2
West
♠KJ854
♥73
♦86
♣9865

06-08-21

East
♠A72
♥84
♦ A K J 10 7
♣K43

South
♠9
♥ K Q J 10 9 6 5
♦32
♣AQJ
South

West

North

4♥

Pass

Pass

East
1 NT
Pass

Opening lead: ♦ 8
Victor Hugo could have been
commenting about bridge players
when he pointed out: “A man is
not idle because he is absorbed in
thought. There is a visible labor and
there is an invisible labor.”
In today’s deal, how should the
play have gone in four hearts? West
led the diamond eight: nine, 10, two.
East cashed the diamond ace and
continued with the diamond jack.
COPYRIGHT: 2021, UNITED FEATURE SYNDICATE

This contract defeated all
seven declarers in a Spanish tournament some years ago. They ruffed
the third round of diamonds high,
drew two rounds of trumps ending
in the dummy, took the club finesse
and cashed the club ace. When the
king didn’t drop, they conceded
down one.
Could East have held only two
clubs? Not really, because that
would mean he had opened one notrump with 4=2=5=2 shape -- not
impossible, but unlikely.
Given that East has three clubs,
South, with only one dummy entry
for two finesses, must run all of his
trumps after taking a club finesse.
The dummy retains the queen-10 of
spades and a club. South has one
spade and the ace-jack of clubs left.
Which three cards does East keep?
He must hold two clubs, so comes
down to one spade. If he retains
the ace, a low-spade exit endplays
him to lead away from the club
king, taking the second finesse for
South. But if East jettisons the ace,
a low spade toward dummy’s queen
leaves West with no answer.
South scores a 10th trick with
either dummy’s spade queen or his
club jack.
To defeat the contract for sure,
East had to cash the spade ace at
trick two or three -- not obvious.

Tues., 6/8

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