Details for CITIZEN PROMOS/FILLERS - Ad from 2021-10-12

Bridge

♠
♥
♦
♣

By Phillip Alder

time hovers o'er the contract

Dealer: South
Vulnerable: East-West

North
10-12-21
♠843
♥A7543
♦K8
♣632
West
♠AQ9
♥ Q 10 6
♦542
♣AJ87

East
♠J7652
♥9
♦ 10 9 7 6
♣ 10 9 4
South
♠ K 10
♥KJ82
♦AQJ3
♣KQ5

South
1♥
4♥

West
Dbl.
Pass

North
3♥
Pass

East
Pass
Pass

Opening lead: ♦ 5
How often have you looked at
your watch to drop an unsubtle hint
to a slowpoke? However, take your
time on this deal from a tournament
in the watch center of the world,
Switzerland. How should South play
in four hearts after West leads the
diamond five?
North-South were lucky to be
employing a four-card-major system. If North plays in four hearts,
COPYRIGHT: 2021, UNITED FEATURE SYNDICATE

a spade lead defeats the contract
easily.
I dislike takeout doubles with
4-3-3-3 distribution and minimum
opening strength, especially without
a four-card major. North’s threeheart response was preemptive.
(With a limit raise, North would
have bid an artificial two no-trump.)
Holding 19 points, South felt justified in bidding game.
One declarer speedily won
trick one with dummy’s diamond
king, cashed the heart ace-king and
ran the diamonds, discarding two
spades from the dummy. However,
West ruffed and returned a low club.
Whatever South did next, he had to
lose one heart and three black-suit
tricks: down one.
The winning line was found
by Janusz Polec, a Polish world
champion in 1978. He won the first
trick in the dummy, then led a club
to the king and ace. West returned
a diamond, and Polec cashed a third
round, discarding a club from the
dummy. Next he played the club
queen, ruffed the club five on the
board, drew two rounds of trumps
ending in his hand and led the diamond jack. West discarded, but at
trick 10, Polec put him on play with
a trump. West had to lead a spade
around to declarer’s king or concede
a ruff-and-sluff. So Polec lost only
one spade trick and made his contract.
Tues., 10/12

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