Details for CITIZEN PROMOS/FILLERS - Ad from 2019-10-09

Bridge By Phillip Alder
♠

♥
♦
♣

If partner overbIds, you must overplay

Dealer: South
Vulnerable: Both
North
♠7
♥J854
♦AQJ3
♣Q762
West
♠ K Q J 10 6 5
♥63
♦K7
♣A98

10-09-19

East
♠942
♥ Q 10 9
♦9862
♣ K 10 5

South
♠A83
♥AK72
♦ 10 5 4
♣J43
South
1♣
2♥

West
1♠
2♠

North
Dbl.
4♥

East
Pass
All Pass

Opening lead: ♠ K
Emily Dickinson wrote, “Luck is
not chance, it’s toil; fortune’s expensive smile is earned.”
That is usually true. At the
bridge table, unless you and your
partner are excessively cautious in
the auction, you will often need some
luck to make your contract. This is
especially true if you have pushed
into a thin game.
In today’s deal, South is in four
COPYRIGHT: 2019, UNITED FEATURE SYNDICATE

hearts. When the dummy comes
down, declarer cannot count 10 top
tricks. How should he try to get lucky
after taking the first trick with his
spade ace?
The one-club opening wouldn’t
bring a smile to anyone’s face
(because the suit is so poor), but
when you have ace-king, ace, you
should strain to open. North makes
a negative double to show his heart
length, South “raises” his partner’s
suit, and North hopes for the best.
Declarer realized that he could
not handle bad breaks. He needed
either a doubleton heart queen or no
diamond loser.
Since time was of the essence,
South immediately led a low diamond
to dummy’s jack. When the finesse
worked, declarer played a heart
to his ace and continued with his
remaining low diamond. When the
king appeared, South won with dummy’s ace, played a trump to his king,
ruffed a spade on the board, played
a diamond to the 10, ruffed his last
spade, discarded a club on the diamond queen and claimed. Declarer
took one spade, three hearts, four
diamonds and two spade ruffs.
Finally, note that South had
to resist the temptation to run his
diamond 10; otherwise, West would
have covered with the king and held
declarer to three diamond tricks.

Wed., 10/9

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