Details for CITIZEN PROMOS/FILLERS - Ad from 2019-09-12

Bridge By Phillip Alder
♠

♥
♦
♣

cooperating with your partner

Dealer: East
Vulnerable: Both
North
09-12-19
♠J9632
♥ -♦72
♣AQ9854
West
♠ 10 8 7 5 4
♥Q542
♦QJ4
♣K

East
♠Q
♥83
♦ A K 10 9 8 6
♣ 10 6 3 2

South
♠AK
♥ A K J 10 9 7 6
♦53
♣J7
South

West

North

4♥

Pass

Pass

East
2♦
Pass

Opening lead: ♦ Q
Joseph Priestley, whom many
credit as the discoverer of oxygen,
said, “The more elaborate our means
of communication, the less we communicate.”
That might have been the case
in the 18th century, but not today.
Email and, in particular, texting have
greatly increased the amount we
communicate.
At the bridge table, defenders
COPYRIGHT: 2019, UNITED FEATURE SYNDICATE

have to communicate, but if one
defender sends a signal, it will be
important for his partner to interpret
it correctly. Is it attitude, count or
suit-preference?
How should East-West card to
defeat four hearts in today’s deal
after West leads the diamond queen?
East opened with a textbook
weak two-bid, and South bid what
he hoped he could make. Remember
that you do not pre-empt against a
pre-empt. South’s four hearts was
even stronger than three hearts
would have been.
East wonders how many diamonds West holds. If the queen is
a singleton, East needs to overtake
with his king, cash the ace and continue with the diamond 10. West can
ruff away South’s jack and hopefully
have one more trick somewhere. But
that is unlikely. If West has two or
three diamonds, the right defense is
different.
At trick one, East should
encourage with the diamond 10.
West knows the diamond count from
East’s opening bid. So, in this layout,
he will shift to his club king at trick
two. South will win with dummy’s
ace, cross to the spade ace and play
trumps from the top. But West will
win the third round, put his partner
on lead with a diamond and receive a
club ruff to defeat the contract.

Thurs., 9/12

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