Details for CITIZEN PROMOS/FILLERS - Ad from 2019-11-02

Bridge By Phillip Alder
♠

♥
♦
♣

do you defend this way or that?

Dealer: South
Vulnerable: North-South
North
♠J72
♥AJ52
♦KQJ
♣KQJ
West
♠ Q 10 6 4 3
♥ -♦A854
♣9854

11-02-19

East
♠AK
♥643
♦ 10 7 6 3
♣ 10 7 6 3

South
♠985
♥ K Q 10 9 8 7
♦92
♣A2
South
2♥

West
Pass

North
4♥

East
All Pass

Opening lead: ♠ 4
Alexander Graham Bell said,
“Great discoveries and improvements
invariably involve the cooperation of
many minds.”
At the bridge table, accurate
defense is sometimes the work of
one player, but more often it requires
cooperation between both defenders.
One of the most important building
blocks is the expectation that each
partner will play the correct cards.
COPYRIGHT: 2019, UNITED FEATURE SYNDICATE

In this deal, for example, how
should the defense proceed after
West leads the spade four against
South’s contract of four hearts?
Note that a pre-emptive opening does not deny a side-suit ace,
although making that bid with two
aces is debatable. North wondered
briefly about responding three notrump, but worried that he would lose
too many spade tricks. Here, though,
he might well have survived. Would
East have started with his two top
spades?
When less-experienced players
have ace-king-third or -fourth in the
suit that partner leads, they think it
makes no difference whether they
win the first trick with the king or ace
-- but it does. With ace-king-third,
you must take the first trick with the
king. If you win with the ace, then
cash the king, you indicate that you
started with that doubleton in the
suit. Then it is partner’s job to tell
you where his entry card lies, so that
he can regain the lead either to cash
the queen or to give you a ruff.
Here, at trick two, West should
drop the spade 10, the unnecessarily
high card being a suit-preference
signal for diamonds. (With the club
ace, he would have played his spade
three.)

Sat., 11/2

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