Details for CITIZEN PROMOS/FILLERS - Ad from 2020-01-11

Bridge By Phillip Alder
♠

♥
♦
♣

the breaks are bad; is there a way?

Dealer: South
Vulnerable: Both
North
01-11-20
♠ A 10 7
♥ -♦AKJ7
♣ Q J 10 9 8 7
West
♠Q9652
♥ Q J 10 9
♦6432
♣ --

East
♠KJ843
♥K75
♦ -♣65432

South
♠ -♥A86432
♦ Q 10 9 8 5
♣AK
South
1♥
2♦
3♥
4♣
5♠
6♣

West
Pass
Pass
Pass
Pass
Pass
Pass

North
2♣
3♦
3♠
4 NT
5 NT
7♦

East
Pass
Pass
Pass
Pass
Pass
All Pass

Opening lead: ♥ Q
Ambrose Bierce, in “The Devil’s
Dictionary,” defined philosophy as
a route of many roads leading from
nowhere to nothing.
So, bridge players must not be
philosophical. On each deal, they
need a single-lane route that leads to
COPYRIGHT: 2020, UNITED FEATURE SYNDICATE

the number of tricks needed to make
or break the contract.
In this deal with nasty shocks
around every turn, how can South
make seven diamonds after West
leads the heart queen?
In the auction, two clubs was
natural and game-forcing. Three
hearts, three spades and four clubs
were control-bids. In answer to
Roman Key Card Blackwood, South
showed two key cards, the diamond
queen (five spades) and the club king
(six clubs).
When the dummy came down,
South saw that seven no-trump was
an immediate claim. But he did not
let that distract him. He wondered
how to survive if diamonds were 4-0
and clubs 5-0. Somehow, he had to
unblock clubs by discarding the ace
and king. One could go on the spade
ace, but what about the other?
South spotted that a dummy
reversal was the way to go. He discarded a club (vital) from dummy at
trick one. He crossed to the board
with a trump, cashed the spade ace
(discarding the club king), ruffed
a spade, returned to dummy with
a trump, ruffed another spade and
drew West’s last two trumps, pitching the club ace on the second. Then
declarer took the last six tricks with
dummy’s clubs.

Sat., 1/11

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