Details for CITIZEN PROMOS/FILLERS - Ad from 2019-09-10

Bridge By Phillip Alder
♠

♥
♦
♣

both fight well, but who wins?

Dealer: North
Vulnerable: Neither
North
♠K65
♥KQ74
♦ A 10 2
♣652
West
♠ J 10 9 4
♥6
♦Q9865
♣ K 10 8

09-10-19

East
♠832
♥85
♦K743
♣J973

South
♠AQ7
♥ A J 10 9 3 2
♦J
♣AQ4
South

West

1♥
4 NT
6♥

Pass
Pass
Pass

North
1♣
2♥
5♠
Pass

East
Pass
Pass
Pass
Pass

Opening lead: ♠ J
George Bernard Shaw said,
“Marriage is popular because it
combines the maximum of temptation
with the maximum of opportunity.”
Yesterday, I gave a deal in
which both East and South played to
the maximum. Here is another. What
should happen in six hearts after
West has led the spade jack?
COPYRIGHT: 2019, UNITED FEATURE SYNDICATE

In the auction, after North raised
hearts, South launched Roman Key
Card Blackwood. North showed two
key cards (the diamond ace and heart
king) and the heart queen. South then
bid what he thought he could make.
He wondered about a grand slam,
but realized that his partner couldn’t
have both black-suit kings, because
he would have either opened one notrump or rebid three hearts.
South saw that he was faced
with two potential club losers. Was
there any chance if West had the club
king?
Yes, declarer spotted one possibility. He won with his spade ace,
drew trumps leaving the king on
the board, cashed the diamond ace,
ruffed the diamond two and took his
other two spade winners, ending on
the board. Then he called for the diamond 10.
If East had carelessly played
low, thinking South was going to ruff,
declarer would have discarded the
club four. This would have endplayed
West, forcing him either to lead away
from the club king into South’s acequeen, or to concede a ruff-and-sluff.
However, East was wide awake. He
put up the diamond king.
Now declarer did his best. He
ruffed, cashed the club ace, crossed
to the board and played a club
toward his queen. However, he had
to fall to defeat. Well played East and
South!
Tues., 9/10

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