Details for CITIZEN PROMOS/FILLERS - Ad from 2019-12-04

Bridge By Phillip Alder
♠

♥
♦
♣

The oldesT is by far The biggesT

Dealer: South
Vulnerable: Neither
North
12-04-19
♠ K 10 6 3 2
♥ 10 4
♦ Q 10 9 3
♣QJ
West
♠8
♥QJ953
♦75
♣A9652

East
♠Q7
♥A8762
♦KJ2
♣K73

South
♠AJ954
♥K
♦A864
♣ 10 8 4
South
1♠

West
Pass

North
3♠

East
All Pass

Opening lead: ♥ Q
Bridge Magazine began publication in England in May 1926. It is
the oldest magazine on the game in
the world. It has two other claims to
fame these days: It is free (arriving
by email) and usually contains more
than 100 pages each month.
There are lots of tournament
reports, but also the usual fare, with
an expert bidding panel, a monthly
bidding match with deals that you
COPYRIGHT: 2019, UNITED FEATURE SYNDICATE

and your partner may try first, and
quizzes.
Julian Pottage sets two tough
defensive problems in each issue, of
which this is one. Look at only the
North and East hands. South is in
three spades. West leads the heart
queen. You overtake with the ace,
and South contributes the king. What
next?
First, count the points. You and
dummy have 21 combined. Declarer
presumably has only 12 or 13; otherwise, he would have gone on to
game. So, partner must have one of
the unseen aces.
If it is the spade ace, the opponents missed a lucky game. If it is
the diamond ace, that potentially gets
your side up to four winners: one
heart and three diamonds. Finally, if
he holds the club ace, you still seem
to have only four tricks: one heart,
one diamond and two clubs. Is it
hopeless?
In theory, yes; but Andy Robson,
one of England’s top players, found
a ruse that worked. At trick two, he
shifted to the diamond two. South,
fearing that that was a singleton,
won the trick with his ace. Now,
though, he had to lose one heart, two
diamonds and two clubs.
Deceptive defense is difficult.
To subscribe, go to newbridgemag.com.

Wed., 12/4

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