Skip to main content
You have permission to edit this article.
Edit
Install a whole house fan
AP

Install a whole house fan

{{featured_button_text}}
diy-fan-20210503

To lower the use and expense of air conditioning, consider installing a whole house fan.

To lower the use and expense of air conditioning a home in the dog days of summer, consider installing a whole house fan to cool it down. The fan, usually installed on the second floor in the ceiling, is designed to pull air through open windows and doors and exhaust it out through the attic to the outdoors. It works best in the evening as the temperature drops, so fresh air is pulled in and forces hot air through attic vents. By morning you’ll be reaching for a blanket after a cool night’s sleep.

An electrician charges $660, including labor and material, to install a belt-driven attic fan that cools a typical 1,500-square-foot house. A homeowner with electrical and carpentry skills can buy one for $450, install it and save about 32%.

The project involves some major heavy-duty work: cutting an opening in the ceiling, installing the unit in the opening, hooking up the wires and then adding the louvered cover panel. This piece is heavy, so have a strong helper on hand to muscle the fan into position. If cutting a hole in your ceiling intimidates you, don’t hesitate to call a contractor.

Follow the fan manufacturer’s directions about wiring the unit into your home’s electrical system and to any switches or controls you choose. For the easiest installation, choose a direct-drive unit that’s designed to fit over the attic floor joists so you don’t have to cut into them. You’ll find them sold online and at home centers and lumberyards.

To find more DIY project costs and to post comments and questions, visit www.diyornot.com.

Pro Cost — DIY Cost — Pro time — DIY Time — DIY Savings — Percent Saved

$660 — $450 — 8.6 — 10.0 — $210 — 32%

0
0
0
0
0

Make your house a home

* I understand and agree that registration on or use of this site constitutes agreement to its user agreement and privacy policy.

Related to this story

Most Popular

Q: We live in a subdivision that was built in 1962. The houses are situated on irregularly shaped lots to form an open area that is landscaped with vistas of mature trees and a leafy, verdant backdrop. Property lines are marked with very low, split-rail fences. We have an open airy feeling in our subdivision. Our picture window looks out over a portion of a neighbor’s lot that makes a pleasant view.

Q: Tim, I have a big decision to make and need your help. I love the look of colored brick for paving, including my driveway, sidewalks and patio. The issue is I’ve started to pay attention to older installations of colored concrete paving brick and many look faded. Why is that happening? Some look horrible, especially at a restaurant I patronize. I don’t want my investment to look faded in a few years. Do I have alternatives, and is there a way to restore the color of faded concrete brick pavers? —Mary Chris F., Tampa, Fla.

What makes a hotel stay feel luxurious is often the simplest things: fluffy towels, clean sheets and mini toiletries there whenever you need them. Want to recreate that same sense of indulgence in your own space? Use these organization ideas to give your home the five-star treatment.

Q: Tim, I’ve got several plumbing repairs to make, and I just don’t have the money to hire a plumber. The water in my bathroom vanity sink drains slower than molasses. Just a year ago it drained really fast. Sometimes my toilet gets clogged, and I think it’s disgusting to use a plunger. Is there another way to unclog a toilet? Lastly, my shower head used to have a nice spray pattern, but now water doesn’t come out evenly and the pressure is reduced. Is there an easy repair for this? —Carol F., Spokane, Wash.

Q: I viewed your YouTube video on home warranties. We live in a 10-year old home in the country. We have a well with a submersible pump and we need to know if in addition to taking care of appliances, would a home warranty also take care of the pump and other assorted plumbing problems if something goes wrong? And can you recommend a good company?

Is there anything more annoying in a bathroom than a towel bar unable to do its only job? As it dangles by one end, off the wall, it is good for nothing and certainly not for hanging a towel. The problem is the hardware fastener no longer works and is pulled out of the wallboard which can be a self-inflicted wound when someone mistakenly took it for a grab bar once too...

Get up-to-the-minute news sent straight to your device.

Topics

News Alerts

Breaking News