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Each morning after I go through emails, I like to take a quick look at my Twitter feed to see if anything interesting is popping up as the day starts.

In recent weeks, that's often meant an eye-brow raising tweet or two from the man who on Friday will become the president of the United States. And among those tweets, there's a good chance that Donald Trump will be lashing out at a journalist or news organization for something that was reported.

On Wednesday, NBC news was the target:

"Totally biased @NBCNews went out of its way to say that the big announcement from Ford, G.M., Lockheed & others that jobs are coming back... to the U.S., but had nothing to do with TRUMP, is more FAKE NEWS. Ask top CEO's of those companies for real facts. Came back because of me!"

As these types of tweets continue, I can't help but wonder how they are viewed by people who don't work in our industry. I'm sure there are the ardent Trump supporters who relish the media-bashing and the Trump opposition that views it as a dangerous threat to the First Amendment and ultimately our democracy.

Perhaps the best information to indicate how this communication strategy is working, though, is Trump's plummeting approval rating.

Whatever the case, I can guarantee one thing to everyone wondering how Trump's handling of the press will play out over time: We will always find a way to report the news.

Last week, I wrote about the danger our industry faces if we fail to meet professional standards and allow our work to get lumped in with "fake news" and other forms of propaganda. I believe that to be true, but I also should have said that I'm confident that won't happen.

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Having worked with and observed the thousands of people who have dedicated their careers to the mission of journalism, I know our industry will never be deterred. Although participants at some political rallies may try to portray us otherwise, journalists are among the most passionate people you'll find when it comes to protecting our democratic form of government. That's a big reason we endure the heckling and the threats: We understand there's a larger purpose in the work we do, and that's to give the public vital information about how its leaders make and implement the decisions that affect everyday life.

So Trump or any other future president may decide to kick the press out of the dedicated office space for reporters in the White House. Those journalists will dig up information and track down sources and do their jobs regardless.

Trump or any other future president may continue to call unflattering reports from respected news organization "fake news," but those stories will be backed up by verified facts that the public can trust.

Trump or any other future president may try to weaken libel laws to try to intimidate news organizations from investigative reporting, but journalists won't be deterred from factual reporting of any kind because no lawsuit can succeed when the truth is published.

I'm hopeful that over time, the next president will figure out a more effective way to work with the media and better understand the importance of the role we play in this amazing country. But even if that doesn't happen, I'm confident that the best and brightest journalists will be up to the challenge.

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Executive editor Jeremy Boyer’s column appears Thursdays in The Citizen and he can be reached at (315) 282-2231 or jeremy.boyer@lee.net. Follow him on Twitter @CitizenBoyer

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