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Three decades after Bill Clinton signed into the law the nation’s family and medical leave legislation, he was back at the White House on Thursday. The 42nd president held forth on what the law has meant to the country, unspooling his trademark blend of storytelling and wonkiness. Clinton seemed a little rusty at first, fumbling through the papers on the lectern to find his remarks. But then he found his stride and was soon dropping names, citing statistics and spinning yarns about the families whose lives have been affected by the legislation. Clinton endorsed President Joe Biden's call to give American workers paid leave.

House Republicans have begun their promised aggressive oversight of the Biden administration. The focus Wednesday was on what watchdogs describe as “indications of widespread fraud” in federal coronavirus aid programs initiated under President Donald Trump.

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House Republicans have begun their promised aggressive oversight of the Biden administration. The focus Wednesday was on what watchdogs describe as “indications of widespread fraud” in federal coronavirus aid programs initiated under President Donald Trump.

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Outgoing White House chief of staff Ron Klain burst into tears Wednesday as he talked about his boss, President Joe Biden, and his decades of work with him. The East Room was packed with White House staff, aides and Cabinet members there to send off Klain, a Biden loyalist who has worked for the president off and on for 36 years. Klain said, “This is the best job I’ve ever had” as the president beamed from the sidelines. Klain said Biden has been a leader, a teacher and a mentor, adding, “I learned everything I know about how to be a good father from Joe Biden.”

A string of historic bipartisan victories during the last Congress — including an update of the Electoral Count Act and transformational investments in infrastructure, semiconductor manufacturing, veterans protections and energy transitions — demonstrate that Congress really can work in a bipartisan and productive manner for the American people.

Republican lawmakers who've spread election conspiracy theories and falsely claimed that the 2020 presidential outcome was rigged are overseeing legislative committees charged with setting election policy in two major battleground states. 

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TUESDAY, Jan. 31, 2023 (HealthDay News) -- The two COVID-19 emergency measures declared by the White House at the start of the pandemic will end in May.

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The future of the nation's nearly $900 billion trucking industry could be shaped in California. State regulators are seeking information to write new rules for the testing and use of self-driving semitrucks. Meanwhile, labor unions are asking the state Legislature to pass a law that they say will protect their jobs. Assemblymember Cecilia Aguiar-Curry on Monday announced a bill that would require autonomous semitrucks to have a human driver present. Representatives from the International Brotherhood of Teamsters said autonomous semitrucks would be safer with a human driver to take over in case of an emergency. The Autonomous Vehicle Industry Association says autonomous trucks already are safer and will benefit the economy.

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President Joe Biden, a daily rail commuter during his years in the Senate, has visited an aging Baltimore tunnel that's slated to be replaced with help from the bipartisan infrastructure legislation he signed in 2021. The Baltimore and Potomac Tunnel project would eliminate a bottleneck that delays commuters and travelers up and down the East Coast. It's estimated to cost $4 billion and take a decade to finish. It's the first of two rail-related stops this week for Biden, who will visit New York on Tuesday where another new tunnel is planned, this one under the Hudson River.

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 President Joe Biden has informed Congress that he will end the twin national emergencies for addressing COVID-19 on May 11, as most of the world has returned closer to normalcy nearly three years after they were first declared. 

The move to end the national and public health emergency declarations will formally restructure the federal coronavirus response to treat the virus as an endemic threat to public health that can be managed through agencies’ normal authorities.

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